Geothermal Energy | How Powerful Is Geothermal Energy?
Tweeter button Facebook button Technorati button Reddit button Linkedin button Delicious button Digg button Flickr button Stumbleupon button Newsvine button

Geothermal Energy | How Powerful Is Geothermal Energy?

I am currently doing a project on geothermal energy in my grade 9 science class. I am currently missing a few numbers and data, so I am in need of your assistance! How powerful is geothermal energy?

Geothermal EnergyGeothermal energy is the heat from the Earth. It’s clean and sustainable. Resources of geothermal energy range from the shallow ground to hot water and hot rock found a few miles beneath the Earth’s surface, and down even deeper to the extremely high temperatures of molten rock called magma.Almost everywhere, the shallow ground or upper 10 feet of the Earth’s surface maintains a nearly constant temperature between 50 and 60F (10 and 16C). Geothermal heat pumps can tap into this resource to heat and cool buildings. A geothermal heat pump system consists of a heat pump, an air delivery system (ductwork), and a heat exchanger-a system of pipes buried in the shallow ground near the building. In the winter, the heat pump removes heat from the heat exchanger and pumps it into the indoor air delivery system. In the summer, the process is reversed, and the heat pump moves heat from the indoor air into the heat exchanger. The heat removed from the indoor air during the summer can also be used to provide a free source of hot water.Geothermal Energy: The Earth’s heat-called geothermal energy-escapes as steam at a hot springs in Nevada.The Earth’s heat-called geothermal energy-escapes as steam at a hot springs in Nevada. Credit: Sierra PacificIn the United States, most geothermal reservoirs of hot water are located in the western states, Alaska, and Hawaii. Wells can be drilled into underground reservoirs for the generation of electricity. Some geothermal power plants use the steam from a reservoir to power a turbine/generator, while others use the hot water to boil a working fluid that vaporizes and then turns a turbine. Hot water near the surface of Earth can be used directly for heat. Direct-use applications include heating buildings, growing plants in greenhouses, drying crops, heating water at fish farms, and several industrial processes such as pasteurizing milk.Hot dry rock resources occur at depths of 3 to 5 miles everywhere beneath the Earth’s surface and at lesser depths in certain areas. Access to these resources involves injecting cold water down one well, circulating it through hot fractured rock, and drawing off the heated water from another well. Currently, there are no commercial applications of this technology. Existing technology also does not yet allow recovery of heat directly from magma, the very deep and most powerful resource of geothermal energy.


Geothermal Energy

Geothermal energy is the heat from the Earth. It’s clean and sustainable. Resources of geothermal energy range from the shallow ground to hot water and hot rock found a few miles beneath the Earth’s surface, and down even deeper to the extremely high temperatures of molten rock called magma.

Almost everywhere, the shallow ground or upper 10 feet of the Earth’s surface maintains a nearly constant temperature between 50 and 60F (10 and 16C). Geothermal heat pumps can tap into this resource to heat and cool buildings. A geothermal heat pump system consists of a heat pump, an air delivery system (ductwork), and a heat exchanger-a system of pipes buried in the shallow ground near the building. In the winter, the heat pump removes heat from the heat exchanger and pumps it into the indoor air delivery system. In the summer, the process is reversed, and the heat pump moves heat from the indoor air into the heat exchanger. The heat removed from the indoor air during the summer can also be used to provide a free source of hot water.

Geothermal Energy: The Earth’s heat-called geothermal energy-escapes as steam at a hot springs in Nevada.

The Earth’s heat-called geothermal energy-escapes as steam at a hot springs in Nevada. Credit: Sierra Pacific

In the United States, most geothermal reservoirs of hot water are located in the western states, Alaska, and Hawaii. Wells can be drilled into underground reservoirs for the generation of electricity. Some geothermal power plants use the steam from a reservoir to power a turbine/generator, while others use the hot water to boil a working fluid that vaporizes and then turns a turbine. Hot water near the surface of Earth can be used directly for heat. Direct-use applications include heating buildings, growing plants in greenhouses, drying crops, heating water at fish farms, and several industrial processes such as pasteurizing milk.

Hot dry rock resources occur at depths of 3 to 5 miles everywhere beneath the Earth’s surface and at lesser depths in certain areas. Access to these resources involves injecting cold water down one well, circulating it through hot fractured rock, and drawing off the heated water from another well. Currently, there are no commercial applications of this technology. Existing technology also does not yet allow recovery of heat directly from magma, the very deep and most powerful resource of geothermal energy.

The thickness of the Earth’s crust is about the same in proportion to the Earth as the thickness of an apple’s skin is to an apple. The Earth within that is hot enough to melt rock and is indeed molten rock. The problem with geothermal is that we can’t drill very deep into the crust and hence must look for the few locations where the heat of the Earth comes to the surface. Suffice it to say that the geothermal energy is unimaginable but we can’t get to most of it.Geothermal heat pumps are not geothermal energy, they use the Earth as thermal mass and hence use other forms of energy more efficiently.

Powered by Yahoo Answers



Facebook Twitter Email

Comments are closed.